Tannim


Tannim

Tannim (hebr.), nach Ein. Schakale, nach And. so v.w. Thanninim, große Seethiere, Seeungeheuer, Drachen, Schlangen, Krokodile.


Pierer's Lexicon. 1857–1865.

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  • CROCODILE — (Heb. תַּנִּיך or תַּנִּים), the largest surviving reptile, with a length of as much as 23 feet (7 m.) or more. The tannim or tannin of the Bible refers to the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) and also to gigantic mythological animals said… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • OWL — OWL, bird belonging to the family Strigidae. Because of the strange appearance of species of the owl, some of their conspecies were called kippuf, that is, resembling a kof ( ape ). It was also said that their eyes are directed forward like those …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • List of the animals in the Bible — See main article Animals in the Bible. The following is a list of animals whose name appears in the Bible. Whenever required for the identification, the Hebrew name will be indicated, as well as the specific term used by Zoologists. This list… …   Wikipedia

  • Animals in the Bible — • The sacred books were composed by and for a people almost exclusively given to husbandry and pastoral life, hence in constant communication with nature Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Animals in the Bible     Anima …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Dragon —    1) Heb. tannim, plural of tan. The name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places and ruins (Job 30:29; Ps. 44:19; Isa. 13:22; 34:13; 43:20; Jer. 10:22; Micah 1:8; Mal. 1:3); probably, as translated in the Revised Version, the jackal… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • EN-ROGEL — (Heb. עֵין רׁגֵל), a spring or well southeast of Jerusalem on the border between the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, between En Shemesh and the Hinnom Valley (Josh. 15:7; 18:16). Jonathan and Ahimaaz, who acted as spies and runners for David when… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • LEVIATHAN — (Heb. לִוְיָתָן, livyatan; Ugaritic ltn, presumably pronounced lōtanu, or possibly, lītanu). In the Bible and talmudic literature the leviathan denotes various marine animals, some real, others legendary, and others again both real and legendary …   Encyclopedia of Judaism